Top Ten Books Dealing With Tough Subjects

For more info go to: The Broke and The Bookish
1. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein - A WWII story about women spies and fighter pilots. This is one of those stories that broke my heart. It's more than just espionage. It's about love, loyalty, bravery, and friendships.

2. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak - Another WWII story made heartbreakingly sad through the words of a young girl named Liesel. Being a kid, and growing up in the middle of war is one of the hardest experiences there is.

3. Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson - It's a haunting and riveting story that won me over because of it's prose which somewhat took away the grisliness of such a topic as eating disorders but did not fail in making me realize it's actual gravity.    

4. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson - Speak deals with a traumatic event that led Melinda to suppress her feelings and shut herself out of the real world. I appreciated it's honest depiction of a teen's internal monologue. 

5. Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver - This book tackles bullying and suicide which have seemingly become a cause and effect thing. I appreciate how Oliver used the whole "groundhog day" spin in telling the story and made use of the point of view of the bully.

6. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky - Amidst Charlie's sweetness, innocence and sensitivity and all of his mixed tapes and Christmas gifts, is a somewhat dark experience. And I loved how Chbosky created that mix of light and dark through the character of Charlie.  

7. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro - I cannot elaborate on this book's plot for fear of spoilers but it's a story that sparks an ethics debate, about the idea of humans playing God. It has a haunting and melancholy air to the story that somewhat stays with you long after you're done.

8. Life of Pi by Yann Martel - A novel that explores faith and spirituality. All told through an unlikely adventure in a life boat with a young boy, a tiger, an orangutan, a hayena, and a zebra.  

9. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins - War, rebellion, exploitation of children, violence. The Hunger Games Trilogy contains a whole slew of moral and societal issues embedded inside a story with non-stop action and sympathetic characters.

10. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card - Another novel filled with moral and ethical dilemmas, and religious issues. And just like Hunger Games, central to it would be the themes of war, and the exploitation of children, along with bullying as well, only it is set in space. And whilst this is science fiction, one does not have to worry about getting confused with a whole bunch of technical and scientific jargon, the story has very few of those. It is very to easy to get into and terribly is exciting.   

Comments

  1. The Hunger Games definitely fits on this list, now that I think about it. The Book Thief made me cry so hard, especially at the end. I really want to read Life of Pi sometimes. Nice list.

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    1. Hi Becca! Life of Pi is pretty good. Aside from the religious theme, I like that it is an adventure story about facing all odds. :)

      And The Book Thief really messes with your tear ducts. Liesel and Max! Sob. :)

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  2. I'd really like to read The Perks of Being a Wallflower, especially since the movie came out not too long ago. Before I Fall is a good idea for this list; I didn't think of it because I read it so long ago. Nice TTT post & thanks for stopping by mine.

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    1. Perks is a lovely short quick read. And I find Charlie to be such a memorable YA character. I think you'll like it. Before I Fall was a surprising favorite for me, just last year. :)

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  3. Terrific choices! It is so refreshing to see someone who is not afraid to call a spade a spade, even with some of the most current popular books. I commend you. <3

    Here is our Top Ten for the week. We look forward to seeing you on Harlie's Books!

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    1. Aw, Thank You! I'll be sure to check out your list. :D

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  4. I love your list,Tin! I love Speak too.:)

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    1. Hi Lynai! Speak is a great YA book no? Wintergirls too, although it's more harrowing than the first. I think Laurie Halse Anderson has a knack for tackling serious topics. But I am curious about her somewhat 'lighter' books like the one entitled Prom, which is about well, Prom. Hee. :)

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    2. I've read only two L.H. Anderson books -- Speak and Catalyst. Both tackled teen issues (especially bullying) and I love how the author handled the issues well. I've heard a lot about Wintergirls, I might as well add it up on my TBR. :)

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    3. Catalyst looks mighty interesting. I love geeky characters. Hee. Adding it to my TBR. Yes to Wintergirls! But a bit of warning though. It's more distressing and nerve-wracking. :)

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